Picture View From Bears Breeches To Blue Hibiscus

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Common Name    Latin Name
Bears Breeches     Acanthus spinosus
S_acanthus_spinosus-c_bears_breeches This plant was well known to the Romans who used the leaf shape on many of their buildings. It is a vigorous grower and its leaves are very architectural. I like this plant because the flower head seems to be in flower for several months. The seed pod grows beneath the white sepal which usually stays attached. The snails love this plant and by the end of the year it looks worse for wear, but being vigorous it outgrows this predation.
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Bedding Begonia     Begonia semperflorens Double
S_begonia_semperflorens_double-c_bedding_begonia Some people dislike these Begonias, but they are very useful for edging plants and continually flower until the frost. This one is a double flowered variety and looks very stunning.
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Bedding Begonia     Begonia semperflorens
S_begonia_semperflorens-c_bedding_begonia Some people dislike these Begonias, but they are very useful for edging plants and continually flower until the frost. They come in several leaf and flower colours as seen here. To me the white and light pink colours look better with the bronze leaf variety. Being succleny plants they can withstand some dought, but like most begonias they prefer moist soil. Massed together like this they provide a pleasant sight for some months.
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Beefstake Plant     Iresine herbstii
S_iresine-herbstii-c_beefstake-plant Sometimes some red is needed to complement the green of the plants in the garden. This plant is not grown for its flowers, but for its red leaved. In certain positions it can add variety to any garden. here mixed with other flowers it is almost a flower itself.
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Begonia Red     Begonia red
S_begonia____-c_begonia_red Begonias is a bulb for the damp shade. It does not like too much shade and requires some sun. There are so many varieties, cultivars, colours and shape that any taste can be accommodated. The bulbus kind are dried after the first frost and replanted the following year where they do even better. One of my bulbs is now about nine inches in size. and the stems are about one and a half inches.
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Begonia Rex[2]     Begonia rex
S_begonia_rex-c_begonia_rex Here the Begonia rex is in flower. I believe this variety is called Christmas. These flowers appered in autumn after several months of flowerless growth. The flowers are beautiful, but the leaves are wonderful in their own right. They brighten up shady areas of the garden. I have several growing where other plants will not grow because of the shade.
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Begonia Southerlandii     Begonia southerlandii
S_begonia_southerlandii-c_begonia_southerlandii This orange begonia is wonderful for baskets and pots. During the cold end of year around November to December it dies down dropping many tiny bulblets on the ground. The bulbils start to appear in the autumn in the axix of the branching stems. If you are not careful to lable it you may well easily throw the soil away, but if you are patient in the spring it starts to regrow and continually flowers until the next cold winter approaches.
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Begonia white     Begonia____
S_begonia____-c_begonia_white This bulbous Begonia is growing in the shade of the arch of climbers as you enter the gate. The bulb is now about nine inches. Every year after the frost has singed the leaves I dig it up and dry it out in the cool greenhouse. I then replant it out after the spring frost has gone, about mid May, by which time it has already started to regrow. Plenty of water is required during the growing season. It continually flowers until the frost.
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Bergamot     Mondara libra
S_mondara_libra-c_bergomot This is a highly aromatic, perennial with whorls of hooded' tubular, vibrant rose-pink flowers held on brown bracts over a long period from mid to late summer. It has pointed, aromatic, nettle like leaves. It likes moist soil in full sun or part shade and grows to about 70cm (2ft).
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Bergamot     Mondara schneewittchen
S_mondara_schneewittchen-c_bergamot This plant is synonymous with Snow Maiden. It has Abundant stems of white hooded flowers over a clump of fresh green foliage from mid to late summer. All parts of the plant are scented as bergomot is used in Earl Grey tea. It perfers an open sunny spot with dryish soils and grows to about 1 mtr(3ft).
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Bird Feed     Bird feed
S_bird_feed-c_bird_feed During the spring, summer, autumn and winter I receive many bird visitors, some of which nest in the garden sometimes inches from my face. Birds that I have known to have nested in the garden are bluetits, starlings, wren, robins and blackbirds. In order to attract more I fill two bird feeders. The chorus of bluetits nesting just outside your bedroom window can sometimes be distracting yet wonderful.
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Bird of Paridise     Srtelitzia regina
S_srtelitzia_regina-c_bird_of_paridise The wonder of nature never gets boring. This flower epitimizses a lot about nature. The phenumatics, the folding, the arangements of each organ, the colours, the chemicals, the nectar and much more is encapsulated in this flower. No wonder we call it the bird of paradise. In the late spring summer and autumn This plant lives outdoors. it flowers in the early spring and therefore it is not suitable for flowering in the garden over here.
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Black Eye Susan     Thumbergia alata
S_thumbergia_alata-c_black_eye_susan This is the orange version of the Black Eye Susan it is quite tempermental in its growth and flowering. It takes some time to get going and flowers well in the warm summer. If the summer is cool I find it does not continue to flower profusely. The yellow version is much easier to grow and flowers until later in the year.(see next two pictures) Never the less it is a striking climber when in full flower.
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Black Mondo Grass     Ophiopogon planiscapus nigrescens
S_ophiopogon_planiscapus_nigrescens-c_black_mondo_grass This hardy Black Mondo Grass, is an evergreen perennial that makes a good groundcover or edge plant for the border of a garden. This one was completely overgrown most of the summer and autumn and survived. Its strap-like leaves can reach 15 inches (37.5 cm) tall and leaves will be up to ¼ inch (6 mm) wide. The foliage starts out green and then quickly turns dark black. Plants spread by underground stolons with thick fleshy roots.
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Black Olive     Olea____
S_olea____-c_black_olive This black olive seems to be hardy and flowers well on this south facing wall of climbers. The leaves and flowers blend in with the surroundings. I bought this more of a fad and another fruit for the garden. Unfortunately the taste of the black olive is unpleasant to me, so I am going to try and obtain a green variety when I see one for sale.
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Blazer Primrose     Marguerite daisy crazy
S_marguerite_daisy_crazy-c_blazer_primrose This plant flowers for a long time from spring to autumn. It can be cut back to old wood and it will regrow. This one is now about three years old and has been in the same pot all this time. The tips of the leaves sometimes get chloritic and is a minor problem I have not solved so far. It seems to be reasonable hardy surviving outside in a sheltered place since planting. I enjoy the double daisy type flowers all year round.
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Bleeding Heart     Dicentra spectablis
S_dicentra_spectablis-c_bleeding_heart This flower is beautiful in any garden it is a perennial, but I find that after about two or three years the roots gets woody and the plant dies. It flowers in the early spring and the leaves are deeply lobed and attractive.
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Bloodflower     Ascelpias curassavica
S_ascelpias_curassavica-c_ascelpias_curassavica The flower of this plant reminds me of the Lantana tangerine, but the flowers are spaced out more. It is a tender plant that produces lots of seeds, which can be readily propagated. It can just about survive in a cold greenhouse for planting out the following year. The sap is milky and could be a skin irritant. In some countries it is a feared weed, because the seeds propagates like Willowherb.
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Blue Dawn Flower     Ipomoea indica
S_ipomoea_indica-c_blue_dawn_flower This version of Ipomea is smaller than the I. Hevenly Blue seen above in the same picture. There are many other colours of Ipomea and mixed together they give a great display. In the tropics this is also known as morning glory, but I prerfer the Hevenly Blue morning glory, which is much more vigorous with larger flowers. This one actually self seeded itself in the fence trough and produced a good display.
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Blue Hibiscus     Alyogyne huegelii
S_alyogyne_huegelii-c_blue_hibiscus This is a new plant for 2007. It should be hardy, but may not like phosphorus in its feed as it comes from western Australia. It should tolerate dry conditions. It may become straggly if not pruned after flowering. The more pruning the compact a shrub it will become. It should produce seeds which last for years and semi-ripe cuttings should root well. I am looking forward to next year, but will be taking cuttings just in case.
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