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Nitrogen Deficiency



P_nitrogendif

Nitrogen Deficiency

Usually appear in

All Year


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Caused By:-     Lack of Available NItrogen

Description

Phaseolus vulgaris nitrogen deficiency. Picture from Wikimedia Commons.
The effects of nitrogen deficiency is not a pest as such, but is a symptom that there is something wrong, usually with soil nutrients. All plants with perhaps the exception of nitrogen fixing legumes are prone to nitrogen deficiency. Symptoms include poor plant growth, leaves are pale green or yellow. On trees or larger plants the lower leaves show symptoms first, but on quick growing herbaceous plants the young leaves exhibit a yellowing first which can be mistaken for other nutrient deficiency. Flowering and fruiting may be delayed and the stems are weak and spindly. Leaves often turn orange, red or purplish as the green chlorophyl is much reduced as in the Autumn and may fall prematurely. The yellowing in nitrogen deficiency is uniform over the entire leaf including the veins. As the deficiency progresses, the leaves also show more of a tendency to wilt under mild water stress. Recovery of nitrogen deficient plants to applied nitrogen is immediate in a matter of days.
See also BORON DEFICIENCY, CALCIUM DEFICIENCY, IRON DEFICIENCY, MAGNESIUM DEFICIENCY, MANGANESE DEFICIENCY, MOLYBDENUM DEFICIENCY, PEAR BORON DEFICIENCY, PHOSPHORUS DEFICIENCY, POTASSIUM DEFICIENCY.


Control

Prevention and control of nitrogen deficiency can be achieved in the short term byfoliar feeding and using an organic compost mulch. In the longer term building up levels of organic matter in the soil will cure many nutrient deficiencies. Sowing green manure crops such as grazing rye to cover soil over the winter will help to prevent nitrogen leaching, while leguminous green manures will fix additional nitrogen from the atmosphere.
Nitrogen deficiency in plants can occur when woody material such as sawdust is added to the soil. Soil organisms will utilise any nitrogen in order to break down the wood, thus making it temporarily unavailable to growing plants. 'Nitrogen robbery' is more likely on light soils and those with low organic matter content, although all soils are susceptible. Cold weather, especially early in the season, can also cause a temporary shortage.


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