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Hemerocallis Gall Midge



P_hmcallisgalmidge

Hemerocallis Gall Midge

Usually appear in

Spring and Summer


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Caused By:-     The Larvae of the Insect Contarinia quinquenotata

Description

Very few things affect the Day lilies(Hemerocallis), but a major pest which seems to effect mainly the early-flowering Daylily buds is the Hemerocallis Gall Midge.
They are small flies which lays hundreds of eggs in the developing Daylily flower bud.
The midge overwinters in the soil and adults emerge during May-June. The females are 2mm long greyish-brown flies. The larvae are cream coloured that grow up to 3mm long. They develop within the buds causing the buds to become swollen. The infected buds fail to open and later dry up or rot. The petals within the buds are abnormal and crinkled, with the larvae living at the base of the petals in a watery liquid. There may be hundreds of larvae in a single bud. When fully fed, the larvae leave the buds and go into the soil where they overwinter inside silk cocoons.
See also these other Galls ACER GALL MITES, ACORN GALL MITES, AZELAE GALL, BEECH GALL MIDGE, BLACKCURRANT GALL MIDGE, BROOM GALL MIDGE, CAMELLIA GALL, CROWN GALL, EUONOMUS GALL, FELT GALL MITES, FORSYTHIA GALL, GALLS, GALL WASP, GLEDITSIA POD GALL MIDGE, HAWTHORN BUTTON TOP GALL MIDGE, KNOPPER GALL OF ACORNS, LEAFY GALL, LIME NAIL GALL MITE, OAK GALL WASP, PEAR LEAF BLISTER MITE, PINAPPLE GALL ALDELGID, PLUM GALL MIDGE, ROBINS PINCUSHION, VINE ERINOSE GALL MITE, VIOLET GALL MIDGE, WILLOW BEAN GALL SAWFLY.


Control

Because they are inside the galled buds, larvae are protected from contact insecticides. Therefore systemic insecticides may be the only option.
The midge tends to only attack early flowering or sometimes specific Daylilies and therefore early flowering varieties could be planted as a trap and the buds picked off and destroyed before the larvae are able to complete their cycle and become a major pest.
This is a very effective method of controlling this pest. This will reduce the damage in the following year as the midge only has one generation per year. The effectiveness of this depends on how efficient the infected bud-picking is carried out and whether nearby gardens also have infested plants.



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