Pests and Diseases Viewer

Gleditsia Pod Gall Midge



P_gledpgallmidge

Gleditsia Pod Gall Midge

Usually appear in

Spring and Summer


Back to Pests and Diseases


Caused By:-     The Insect Dasineura gleditchiae

Description

Gleditsia Pod Gall Midge causes reddish galls to occur at the tips of the branches of the Honey Locust tree(Gleditsia triacanthos). Leaflets become pod-like where they have been damaged by the midge inside this pod the larvae continue feeding and where the small white larvae can be found. The galls appear in spring within a week of the eggs being laid in early spring and is usually most common on thornless, seedless cultivars. The galls darken, dry and drop a few weeks after adults emerge the tree may then looks as though it is missing many leaves. Although Gleditsia gall midge looks very unsightly it does not usually affect the vigour of the tree too much, but repeated attacks may even cause the death of small branches. Adult midges are tiny, delicate gray-brown flies emerge from the soil under previously infected trees from March to April to lay eggs on the leaflets at the first sign of leaf breaking in spring. Larvae feed within the galls where they develop and pupate. There can be several generations during the summer with the last emerging larvae overwintering as [late instar larvae or] pupae in cocoons in the soil mostly in the upper two inches near the base of the tree trunks. The larvae are 5mm long when mature and pupate within the galls.
See also these other Galls ACER GALL MITES, ACORN GALL MITES, AZELAE GALL, BEECH GALL MIDGE, BLACKCURRANT GALL MIDGE, BROOM GALL MIDGE, CAMELLIA GALL, CROWN GALL, EUONOMUS GALL, FELT GALL MITES, FORSYTHIA GALL, GALLS, GALL WASP, HEMEROCALLIS GALL MIDGE, HAWTHORN BUTTON TOP GALL MIDGE, KNOPPER GALL OF ACORNS, LEAFY GALL, LIME NAIL GALL MITE, OAK GALL WASP, PEAR LEAF BLISTER MITE, PINAPPLE GALL ALDELGID, PLUM GALL MIDGE, ROBINS PINCUSHION, TURNIP GALL WEEVIL, VINE ERINOSE GALL MITE, VIOLET GALL MIDGE, WILLOW BEAN GALL SAWFLY.


Control

The severity of the attack depends to a certain extent on the variety or cultivar you have.
The midges are not easy to control but applications of ant killer powder around the bottom of the tree in early spring could kill some adults as they emerge.
Also soil drenching with insecticide may kill some overwintering adults.
Raking over the soil to expose the pupae to the birds would also help.
The timing of insecticides is very important in order to control this pest as once inside the pods they are usually immune from attack by chemicals. For maximum effectiveness, insecticide application should be in early in the season while populations are generally still at the early stage of development.
As the season progresses, the insect will be present in egg, larva, pupa, and adult stages. Insecticides applied to developing shoots and repeated at 10 day intervals throughout the season will provide some level control.
Biological control is possible late in the season by a parasitic wasp and other larvae eating bugs.


Back to top